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Most Recent Mental Health

The Key to your Future 2011 Quick Reference Directory

Click here to download DRW’s Quick Reference Directory for resources in Mental Health, Employment, Self-Advocacy, Independent Living/Housing, Educational Advocacy, Benefits and MORE!!

Patient Rights and the Grievance Procedure

What are “Patient Rights”?

According to Wisconsin law, “patient rights” apply to any individual who is receiving services for mental illness, developmental disability, or alcohol or drug abuse. These rights cover people who are voluntary patients, involuntary patients, forensic patients, people who are in community treatment programs, people who are in hospitals or residential facilities, people who are private pay, meaning their own insurance is paying for their care, or people whose care is being paid for by a state or county agency. Patient rights come from Sec. 51.61 of the Wisconsin Statutes and Chapter HFS 94 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code.

Treatment rights include the right to prompt and adequate treatment in the least restrictive environment, the right to give informed consent for treatment and medication and the right to not be unduly subjected to seclusion or restraints.

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Legal Protection from Abuse and Neglect by Mental Health Service Providers

How is abuse and neglect defined?

Newly created legislation (1993 Act 445) makes it a crime for mental health service providers to intentionally or recklessly abuse or neglect a client or to knowingly permit another to abuse or neglect a client. Wisconsin statutes define the following terms to clarify the legislation.

Intentional abuse includes: a) an intentional act, omission or course of conduct that is not reasonably necessary for treatment or maintenance of order and discipline in a pr ogram or treatment facility that either results in bodily harm or great bodily harm or intimidates, humiliates, threatens, frightens or otherwise harasses a client, or b) the forcible administration of medication to or performance of psychosurgery, electroconvulsive therapy or experimental research on a client with the knowledge that no lawful authority exists for the administration or performance.

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Understanding the Funding System for People with Developmental Disabilities or People with Mental Illness

An overview of the funding sources available to support people with disabilities in the community. 2004

Click here to download Understanding the Funding System for People with Developmental Disabilities or People with Mental Illness

Advocacy Tool Kit: Skills for Effective Self and Peer Advocacy

A kit that provides information and skill building exercises to develop and enhance self and peer advocacy skills. It includes information about Informal Advocacy Strategies, Formal Advocacy Strategies, Peer Advocacy, Communication Skills, and Self-Care While Doing Advocacy. This book is available for download, or you may order a printed copy below for a $25 fee.

Click here to download the Advocacy Tool Kit

Click here to order the Advocacy Tool Kit or
contact us by email at info@drwi.org or
by phone at (608) 267-0214 / (800) 928-8778 / TTY: (888) 758-6049

Where to Now? A Guide to Resolving Complaints within the Mental Health System

Manual explaining the various avenues to filing a complaint or grievance against a mental health service, program or individual providers. 60 pages. $3.00

Click here to order Where to Now or
contact us by email at info@drwi.org or
by phone at (608) 267-0214 / (800) 928-8778 / TTY: (888) 758-6049

Standing Up for Your Rights

Videotape guide to the grievance procedure in Wisconsin. Videotape. $3.00

Click here to order Standing Up for Your Rights or
contact us by email at info@drwi.org or
by phone at (608) 267-0214 / (800) 928-8778 / TTY: (888) 758-6049

The Fifth Standard for Civil Commitment

Prior to the enactment of the fifth standard legislation (1995 Wisconsin Act 292), there were four standards by which a person could be considered “dangerous” enough to be involuntarily committed to receive treatment for mental illness. The “fifth standard” adds another category to this list.

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