Archive for November, 2007

Family Care Expansion: Envisioning a Positive Future

This paper presents DRW’s vision for the future under Wisconsin’s long-term care program, Family Care.

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Resource Guide: Addressing and Ending Violence Against Women with Disabilities

DRW, in collaboration with the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN), devised this Resource Guide for Protection & Advocacy agencies (P & As) across the country. It is designed to promote the necessity for and benefits to P & As joining with sexual assault and domestic violence programs to forge partnerships on issues of violence against women with disabilities. 2006

Click here to download Resource Guide: Addressing and Ending Violence Against Women with Disabilities

Voting Rights Reference Guide

This voting information was gathered to be a reference for DRW staff, people with disabilities, advocates, providers, family members and others who have questions about the voting process in Wisconsin. The information focuses on the rules and regulations that impact the individual voter.

Click here to download Voting Rights Reference Guide

Financial Independence: What you can expect from Payeeships

What is a Representative Payee?

A representative payee is someone assigned by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to help a person who receives Social Security or SSI manage their money. This happens when a person with a mental or physical disability is determined to be incapable of handling their money in their best interests.

Who can be a payee?

A payee can be a social service agency, a relative, or another person who is approved by SSA. Under the Wisconsin patients’ rights law, an agency or facility can act as a payee only under certain circumstances: when the consumer or their guardian gives written informed consent for this service or when another suitable payee cannot be found.

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Patient Rights and the Grievance Procedure

What are “Patient Rights”?

According to Wisconsin law, “patient rights” apply to any individual who is receiving services for mental illness, developmental disability, or alcohol or drug abuse. These rights cover people who are voluntary patients, involuntary patients, forensic patients, people who are in community treatment programs, people who are in hospitals or residential facilities, people who are private pay, meaning their own insurance is paying for their care, or people whose care is being paid for by a state or county agency. Patient rights come from Sec. 51.61 of the Wisconsin Statutes and Chapter HFS 94 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code.

Treatment rights include the right to prompt and adequate treatment in the least restrictive environment, the right to give informed consent for treatment and medication and the right to not be unduly subjected to seclusion or restraints.

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Legal Protection from Abuse and Neglect by Mental Health Service Providers

How is abuse and neglect defined?

Newly created legislation (1993 Act 445) makes it a crime for mental health service providers to intentionally or recklessly abuse or neglect a client or to knowingly permit another to abuse or neglect a client. Wisconsin statutes define the following terms to clarify the legislation.

Intentional abuse includes: a) an intentional act, omission or course of conduct that is not reasonably necessary for treatment or maintenance of order and discipline in a pr ogram or treatment facility that either results in bodily harm or great bodily harm or intimidates, humiliates, threatens, frightens or otherwise harasses a client, or b) the forcible administration of medication to or performance of psychosurgery, electroconvulsive therapy or experimental research on a client with the knowledge that no lawful authority exists for the administration or performance.

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Visual Impairments Accommodations within School

A Guide to Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act

What are Visual Impairments?
Visual Impairments can include mild vision loss to total blindness. Many students with visual impairments need some type of accommodation or modification made within school. It is important to remember that as vision loss can be so wide ranging, each student’s needs must be considered on an individual basis.

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Health Impairments Accommodations within School

A Guide to Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act

What are Health Impairments?
Health Impairments can be a category of disability for people with health-related conditions which impose limitations to one or more major life function. This can include limitations to learning due to health related disability or the inability to participate in school-related activities due to the health condition. Many students who have health impairments may need accommodations or modifications to help them through the school day. Disabilities are very individual and eligibility for services must be determined on an individual basis.

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Deaf or Hard of Hearing Accommodations within School

A Guide to Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act

What is Deaf or Hard of Hearing?
Deaf or hard of hearing is a category of disability used to describe a wide range of individuals with hearing loss. Because the profoundness of the hearing loss is different for each person, assessments should be done on an individual basis. Accommodations should also be individualized to meet specific needs. Many students who are deaf or hard of hearing receive accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

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Attention Deficit Disorder Accommodations within School

A Guide to Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act

What is Attention Deficit Disorder?
Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity (ADHD) is a neurobiological disorder. Many students with ADD or ADD display behavior that may seem inappropriate such as: impulsiveness, lack of attention, and hyperactivity. In most occurrences these symptoms appear by age seven. While the exact cause of this disorder is not known, several treatment options are available. Medication, behavior modification, counseling, specific diets, and accommodations are often used to assist people with ADD and ADD. Click here to go to the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities.

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